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30 years ago: Anita Cobby

2 February 1986: Anita Cobby The rape and murder of Anita Cobby is arguably the best-known murder in Sydney today, on account of the particularly horrific circumstances of the crime. Cobby was a 26-years-old nurse working at Sydney Hospital who was kidnapped by five men in a stolen car on… Keep Reading

50 years ago: two terrible murders

  29 January 1966: In January 1967 the Sydney Morning Herald would recall 1966 as “an almost unprecedented 12 months of violence” and report that police were still hunting for nine killers. One problem was that several of the 1966 murders appeared to have no motive. On this day cleaner… Keep Reading

50 years ago: the Beaumont children

26 January 1966: The 1960s was the decade when crime rates began to climb and people became more concerned about the safety of their city, and in particular the safety of children. One reason for this was a number of murders that achieved great publicity, including Graeme Thorne in 1960… Keep Reading

Police Reports Now Online

In a welcome move, the NSW Police Force has put up all its annual reports on the newish NSW Open Government website. A year ago, most of these reports were unavailable online or in public libraries. The reports are here: https://www.opengov.nsw.gov.au/searches?query=&agencyId=25639&typeId=+&fromDate=&toDate=&size=&page=     Keep Reading

50 years ago: the capture of Ronald Ryan

6 January 1966: 1966 marked the beginning of a flurry of gang-related violence in Sydney. This would be followed by a long period of peace because of the effectiveness with which leading gangsters such as Fred Anderson, Abe Saffron, Lennie McPherson and George Freeman ran the underworld, in close collaboration… Keep Reading

The Big Whatever

Another delightful historical crime novel from Peter Doyle starring his much-loved petty crim Billy Glasheen. Billy’s putting on the years but that doesn’t stop him engaging fully in various crooked romps in the late 1960s and early 1970s Sydney underworld, as illegal drugs take over from more innocent types of crime.… Keep Reading

Jimmy Sweetman was Jimmy Sweetnam

Malcolm Lambe writes to tell us that the person named in the Australian Prohibition section of the Museum as Jimmy Sweetman has had his name misspelled. It’s actually Sweetnam. Our apologies for that and our thanks to Malcolm, who provides this fascinating account of meeting the man himself … and a… Keep Reading

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